Volume 31 Issue 11 - 9 August 2019

Message from the Principal

Dear Parents and Friends of St Patrick’s College

Sue Lennox - Principal

Last week I attended the Good Samaritan Principals Meeting as well as the meeting with Good Samaritan Education in Melbourne.

One of the presentations over the two days was made by the Chair of Good Samaritan Education as she shared with us the experience the Congregational Leader Sr Patty Fawkner had when she met the Pope with leaders of other religious institutes. As she recollected in The Good Oil (July 2019) the highlight was when the Pope opened the discourse with those gathered by saying “let’s have a conversation”. Through this invitation he encouraged the 850 leaders present not to be afraid of dialogue but to embrace the opportunity to have an adult conversation about the issues that matter. She said Pope Francis listened intently and responded with deep respect. Follow the link to the article: The Good Oil

There is, at times, a reluctance for individuals to have an adult conversation about issues that concern us as it can be viewed as being disrespectful or contrary to our beliefs. Over the last few years we have had a few issues that have needed adult conversations. They include the gay marriage debate, the role of women in the church and the very current abortion debate in parliament now. The benefit of an adult conversation on issues that matter, often leads a person to deepen their faith and guides them to a greater commitment to their belief. Sadly, there are some in our community who fail to see the benefit of these conversations and so withhold opposing views which rob the individual of experiencing the benefits of knowing the two sides of the issue.

Pope Francis is a leader in our Catholic Church who very much believes in building a church that is aware and respectful of the other. One of his first actions once becoming the Pope was to share time with those in prison. He released ‘Laudato Si’ which calls for action on climate change. He recently publicly confronted and held bishops accused of the sexual abuse of children accountable for their actions. He is the only pope who has made a commitment to promote world peace by opening a dialogue between Christianity and Islam. His visit to the great Imam of Al-Azhar in Egypt and his Mosque is a profound gesture of mutual respect and interconnectedness.

At St Patrick’s we also seek ways of engaging girls in adult conversations that will broaden their understanding and respect for the other. Once again the Year 11 students visited the Auburn Mosque for their Studies of Religion course and found it to be both informative and insightful. For some families this is a challenge. Fortunately the excursion to the Buddhist temple, held in the years prior, doesn’t create the same concern. My hope is that over time, all in our community will have the courage to follow our Pope’s lead and engage in adult conversation with each other.

Finally, we all have an opportunity to contribute to the future of the Australian church through participation in the Plenary Council 2020. I encourage you to participate in this process where possible and make your contributions so that the final statement reflects what the congregation believes to be true for the future.

I will leave you with a short reflection on courage.

Blessings

Sue Lennox - Principal 

Let us pray and support one another in taking up the Good Samaritan call to have courage; 
“the courage to see, 
the courage to feel 
and the courage to act”, 
and be encouraged by the words of Yahweh to Joshua 
when he is taking up a new role of leadership 
after the death of Moses: 
“Be strong and courageous. 
Do not be afraid; 
do not be discouraged, 
for the Lord your God will be with you 
wherever you go” (Joshua 1:9).

This is the edited text of an address Sister Sonia Wagner delivered on July 9, 2017 during an event in Brisbane, to celebrate 160 years of Good Samaritan life and mission.

 

Religious Diversity: A Catholic Perspective

Last week Year 11 students visited the Auburn Gallipoli Mosque as part of their study of Islam. Our senior students undertake Studies of Religion, a course that we believe to be of immense value to the students given the nature of the society in which they live. Part of the rationale of the Studies of Religion course states, “This syllabus enables students who live in a multifaith and multicultural society to progress from a broad understanding of religious traditions to specific studies within these traditions”. The religious traditions explored in depth include Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Students also examine Aboriginal belief systems and spiritualities in Australia. The excursions we offer to the students as part of the Studies of Religion course provide opportunities to learn about religious traditions from the perspective of adherents, something we view as vital for student understanding. Our College also embraces diversity and considers itself an inclusive community, one that strives to develop independent, resilient and life long learners. One of our students, Imogen M, has outlined her positive experience on the excursion below:

Auburn Gallipoli Mosque

This visit proved highly relevant to the new topic of Islam that we are starting this term in SOR. Our group first visited ISRA, which we were warmly welcomed into. This information session was highly engaging, not only providing us with the opportunity to learn about the culture and practices embedded within the Islamic faith, but also to participate in an open-forum Q&A. It was particularly interesting to note the many similarities that exist between Islam and other monotheistic religions, such as Christianity. From here, we travelled to the mosque and were so lucky to arrive while midday prayer was concluding, being allowed to observe this ritual from inside the mosque. Being able to see the Islamic faith being practised was certainly a highlight of the trip, as this truly allowed us to feel immersed in and appreciate our surroundings. At the conclusion of midday prayer, the structural, cultural and spiritual significance of the mosque was explained by a member of the mosque, after which we were allowed to explore the sacred space. Apart from being a beautiful design, it was evident that the mosque held great spiritual importance to those who attended its services. This excursion was a rare opportunity that we would otherwise not be likely to encounter in our everyday lives. It is so important to recognise and respect the spirituality and beliefs of all peoples, and by allowing yourself to personally experience the life and culture of another, it becomes evident that there is more similarity amongst our communities than there is difference. It is through excursions such as these that we gain a deeper understanding and appreciation for our fellow neighbour. It was a really great day and we took so much away from the experiences we had- both at ISRA and the mosque.      
Imogen M - Year 11 Student

God willing religious diversity and the importance of interreligious dialogue has been acknowledged by Pope Francis earlier this year when he signed the document, entitled “A Document on Human Fraternity for World Peace and Living Together”, with Ahmed el-Tayeb, Grand Imam of al-Azhar, during an interreligious meeting in Abu Dhabi. The document invites “all persons who have faith in God and faith in human fraternity to unite and work together so that it may serve as a guide for future generations to advance a culture of mutual respect in the awareness of the great divine grace that makes all human beings brothers and sisters.” Francis, as the first pope to visit the Arabian Peninsula, has acknowledged that while each of the Abrahamic faiths have clear differences, it is important to consider what they share in common, in terms of their belief in God and what they are called to do to promote peace in the world. He stated in his keynote address on February 4 at the interreligious meeting involving the signing of the previously mentioned document, “There is no alternative: We either build the future together or there will not be a future”.

Paddy's Diner serves Bennie's Burgers

On Friday 5 July we celebrated Benedict Day. Our Year 12 Hospitality and Business Services classes worked together to create Paddy's Diner where  a delicious array of food was served.

 

The Business Services class under the guidance of Mr Muller created the name and theme for the Pop-up Food stall. They then created order forms and tickets and pre-sold these in the weeks leading up to Benedict Day.

The Hospitality classes developed a menu for the day consisting of Le Bacon de Porc (pulled pork, bacon, crackle, pear and gravy on a brioche bun) served with sweet potato fries, American Cheeseburger served with potato fries, crispy chicken tenders and chocolate brownie with salted caramel and popcorn and smoked ice cream.

We were fortunate to have two visiting chefs from MWLP - Michael Everett and Darren who volunteered their time over the two days to help the Hospitality girls prepare, cook and serve the menu items.

It was a very successful event and a great learning experience for both the Hospitality and Business Services girls.

Maree Durrington - VET Coordinator/TAS Teacher

Mater Dei St Benedict's Feast Day

On Wednesday 31 July four of our Year 10 students Georgia R, Laura D, Breana J, Sophie S and I were privileged to attend Mater Dei's St Benedict Feast Day.

We began the day with an uplifitng mass peformed by Father Michael Williams. The Mater Dei choir joyfully sang the hymns of the mass which was inspiring to our girls. We then had a delicious morning tea with the other visiting schools. Each school was in charge of a job for the middle session of the day. The St Patrick's girls were put in charge of the jumping castle in the infants playground. The Mater Dei students were so excited to see our girls and the girls assisted them with their shoes and jumping around with them in the castle. We then had a beautiful lunch of homemade soups and apple pie prepared by volunteers of Mater Dei. After lunch, we joined all of the Mater Dei students at the disco! This aspect of the day was by far the most fun and the girls loved interacting with the students and showing off their best dance moves. We all left the feast day feeling humbled, joyful and in awe of the positivity of the Mater Dei students and hard-working staff. We would like to take this opportunity to thank the staff and students of Mater Dei for their hospitality and generosity. 

Haylee Williams - Year 10 Pastoral Advisor

HTN and ACF Inter Schools Culinary Competition

Two of our Year 12 Hospitality students, Chloe S and Sophie E, participated in the HTN and ACF Inter Schools Culinary Competition at TAFE NSW Ryde Campus on Thursday 4 July.

The competition required the girls to prepare and present two portions of the following menu item which was demonstrated on the day by a local leading chef:

Corn Fed Chicken presented with Potato Lyonnaise, Creamed Spinach and Roast Dutch Carrots

The team that achieved the highest score for their dish in each kitchen as determined by the judging chefs was then declared the winning team of the culinary challenge.

Congratulations to Chloe and Sophie who were placed third – a wonderful achievement and a great experience for them both.

Maree Durrington - VET Coordinator

Lids4Kids@TheLibrary

Did you know that with just 500 bottletops, the process of building a small plastic limb for a child in need can begin?

One of the articial limbs made by Envision from collected lids.

We can recycle our juice, water and milk bottles but not the lids. But before you toss them into the bin, consider depositing them into the collection box inside the library.

To read more about Envision, the not-for-profit company behind this and other initiatives, click the link. https://envision.org.au/media-coverage-page-and-link/

Once we have a full box, we will take them to the closest collection point which happens to be Mt Carmel Catholic College.

The College Library

Circulation Area@TheLibrary

The circulation area in the library has experienced a slight makeover during the past several weeks.

The main desk has been moved further back, and the charging station table has been moved to sit directly in front of the circulation desk. This has opened the circulation area up considerably, creating much more space for students entering and exiting the library, as well as allowing students easier access to the charging station. There is also new, softer carpeting around the circulation desk.

For those who have yet to witness the new changes, we encourage you to come down to the library and have a look at the new area.

We look forward to seeing you soon,

The College Library

 

What's New in August @ the College Library

The August edition of What's New @ Your College Library is now available!

Each month we email the 'What's New' newsletter to all staff and students, highlighting some of the new books and eResources the Library has added to our collection. Fiction, Non-Fiction, Biographies and Memoirs, Graphic Novels, Picture Books are all included, as well as new eBook and Audiobook titles available via the ePlatform by Wheelers app. This month we have new fiction by favourite Australian authors Tristan Bancks and Kate Forsyth, classics including Journey to the Centre of the Earth and Mary Poppins, and Non-Fiction titles covering varied topics such as plastics and environmental studies, a history of Aboriginal peoples of Sydney, and the genius of Tim Burton. We encourage staff and students alike to let us know if there is something in particular they would like to see included, as we strive to create an ever-expanding and diverse collection that appeals to students of all ages. As always, the library staff are here to help students- whether it's researching for their next assignment or helping choose their next great read.

The College Library

Study@TheLibrary

With Year 12 currently sitting their Trial HSC exams, the library are doing all we can to make their preparations as comfortable as possible.

Year 12 only area.

We have allocated the back study section of the library as a Year 12 only space for the duration of the trials, and have installed a small kitchenette complete with tea, coffee and Milo.

We wish Year 12 all the very best for their exams. 

The College Library

Study Skills Tip For August: The Importance of Quality Sleep for Students

Sleep is crucial not just for physical and mental well-being, but for the consolidation of learning, and to ensure you perform in all your endeavours in peak condition. The absolute last resort should be to sacrifice sleep time in order to get things done.

Image courtesy of Study Skills Handbook email

How much sleep is right for you? This is tricky as everyone is different. Some lucky people need only 6 hours a night, most people need about 8 hours and some people need 10 hours!

Two ways to tell if you are getting enough sleep:

How quickly do you fall asleep at night? If you fall asleep instantly that can be a sign you are not getting enough sleep, it should take 10-15 minutes to fall asleep.

How do you feel when you wake up in the morning? If you feel tired and sluggish then that can also be a sign that you need to get to bed earlier.

IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF YOUR SLEEP:

  • Avoid caffeine (cola drinks, coffee, energy drinks, chocolate) after dinner or even better, no later than 4 pm.
  • Organise as much as you can at night to minimise what you have to do in the morning (eg organise your clothes for the next day, pack your bag).
  • Try to have a half-hour to an hour before you go to bed without computers, TV, phone or any electronic devices or homework or chatting to friends. If you can’t do that, at least put the devices on night mode or turn the brightness down.
  • Set up a relaxing ‘wind-down’ routine before you go to bed. Do this same routine every night (eg warm shower, reading, listening to quiet music) so your brain associates these activities with bedtime and sleep.
  • A drop in body temperature near bedtime triggers the sense that is time to go to sleep. So after a warm bath or hot shower, cool yourself down. It is also better at night to be cool rather than overheated.
  • Keep your room as dark and as quiet as possible at night.
  • When you lie in bed, start at your feet and mentally imagine relaxing each muscle as you slowly work your way up the body. Most people do not make it up to their head before they fall asleep!
  • In the morning open the curtains wide or go out into the sun and get lots of light to help wake your brain. Being exposed to lots of natural light during the day will also help the body produce the melatonin at the right time for a good sleep cycle.
  • A healthy breakfast will help to kick-start your body clock for the day.

Learn more about lifestyle habits of successful students in the Study Skills Handbook found in the College Library.

The College Library

Study Skills Tip For August: The Importance of Quality Sleep for Students copy

Sleep is crucial not just for physical and mental well-being, but for the consolidation of learning, and to ensure you perform in all your endeavours in peak condition. The absolute last resort should be to sacrifice sleep time in order to get things done.

Image courtesy of Study Skills Handbook email

How much sleep is right for you? This is tricky as everyone is different. Some lucky people need only 6 hours a night, most people need about 8 hours and some people need 10 hours!

Two ways to tell if you are getting enough sleep:

How quickly do you fall asleep at night? If you fall asleep instantly that can be a sign you are not getting enough sleep, it should take 10-15 minutes to fall asleep.

How do you feel when you wake up in the morning? If you feel tired and sluggish then that can also be a sign that you need to get to bed earlier.

IMPROVING THE QUALITY OF YOUR SLEEP:

  • Avoid caffeine (cola drinks, coffee, energy drinks, chocolate) after dinner or even better, no later than 4 pm.
  • Organise as much as you can at night to minimise what you have to do in the morning (eg organise your clothes for the next day, pack your bag).
  • Try to have a half-hour to an hour before you go to bed without computers, TV, phone or any electronic devices or homework or chatting to friends. If you can’t do that, at least put the devices on night mode or turn the brightness down.
  • Set up a relaxing ‘wind-down’ routine before you go to bed. Do this same routine every night (eg warm shower, reading, listening to quiet music) so your brain associates these activities with bedtime and sleep.
  • A drop in body temperature near bedtime triggers the sense that is time to go to sleep. So after a warm bath or hot shower, cool yourself down. It is also better at night to be cool rather than overheated.
  • Keep your room as dark and as quiet as possible at night.
  • When you lie in bed, start at your feet and mentally imagine relaxing each muscle as you slowly work your way up the body. Most people do not make it up to their head before they fall asleep!
  • In the morning open the curtains wide or go out into the sun and get lots of light to help wake your brain. Being exposed to lots of natural light during the day will also help the body produce the melatonin at the right time for a good sleep cycle.
  • A healthy breakfast will help to kick-start your body clock for the day.

Learn more about lifestyle habits of successful students in the Study Skills Handbook found in the College Library.

The College Library

Term 3 MISA Teams

Congratulations to the following students on being named in Term 3 MISA teams.

 

Image courtesy of Joshua Combes - CAPA Coordinator

Year 7/8/9 Soccer

Siena B, Lilian M, Logan L, Ashalea W, Emily R, Olivia H, Stevie F, Sophie A, Lily M, Amy M, Charlotte T, Alannah A, Jessica J, Sianna F, Tayissa M and Mia C. Coach Mr East.

Year 7/8 Netball

Krisa K, Amy Y, Eden G, Hannah Y, Mia F, Lucy G, Ilori P, Amelia M, Charlie C and Monique G. Coach Ms Wallin.

Year 9/10 Netball

Bianca R, Katarina S, Sophia E, Elisha L, Lucy O, Olivia S, Charlotte F, Grace K, Amala A and Carrera K. Coach Mrs Nash.

Year 10/11/12 Softball

Rachel T, Minduli T, Brooke K, Amelia M, Amadee T, Ellie F, Hannah P, Jessica N, Kitiana M, Mackenzie L, Zoe D, Emilee O, Lauren W and Rachel W. Coach Mrs Lawrence.

Year 10/11/12 AFL

Rahni W, Piper A, Ruby D, Chantel S, Alysha B, Loretta T, Amy S, Natalie S, Paris H, Alex F, Julia P, Hannah S, Evana S and Laura D. Coach Mrs Arena.

Scott Ashcroft - Sports and Activities Coordinator

Success at the Wollongong Diocesan Netball Championships

It was an extremely successful day for the St Patrick’s netball teams with all six teams finishing in either 1st or 2nd position overall at the recent Wollongong Diocesan Championships. It's been a while since St Pat’s has experienced such high levels of success and suggests there is a bright future ahead for our netball sides.

 

Year 7/8 Division 1 – 1st Place (Undefeated)

Amy Y, Eden G, Hannah Y, Mia F, Lucy G, Ilori P, Amelia M, Charlie C and Monique G. Coach Emily Kirk.

Year 7/8 Division 2 - 1st Place (Undefeated)

Georgia C, Breanna , Annalise D, Aaliyah B, Emily H, Grace G, Helen T, Abby D, Mirae Q and Jaimee C. Coach Emily Kirk.

Year 9/10 Division 1 – 2nd Place

Evana S, Charlotte F, Hannah S, Maya B, Brianna C, Chantel S, Piper A, Lucy O, Katarina S and Cassandra S. Coach Maddison Kirk.

Year 9/10 Division 2 – 2nd Place

Olivia S, Carrera K, Amala A, Elisha L, Sophia E, Grace K, Jess W, Larissa M, Brianna H and Maddison M. Coach Maddison Kirk.

Year 11/12 Division 1 – 1st Place (Undefeated)

Emily A, Amelia A, Julia P, Olivia F, Amy S, Natalie S, Stephanie E, Eva B and Rahniesha W. Coach Mrs Arena.

Year 11/12 Division 2 – 2nd Place

Jessica L, Rachael T, Rachael W, Rachel P, Rachelle R, Leeza M and Minduli T. Coach Mrs Arena.

A massive thank you must go to our coaches, former students Maddison and Emily Kirk as well as Mrs Arena. Thank you to Miss Calka for her support during the day as well as our representative umpires Natalie L, Abbie H, Georgia F and Meg O. Finally, a big thank you to our parents that made the trip down to Wollongong to support their daughter and the College.

Scott Ashcroft - Sports and Activites Coordinator

History Club Praised in State Parliament

On 30 July 2019 the History Club’s Anzac nurses and myself accompanied by Mr Jeff McGill and Lucette and Paul Zapirain attended State Parliament. Mr Greg Warren, Member for Campbelltown, gave a Private Member's Statement focusing on the History Club’s commemoration of war nurses this year. All the girls who dressed as Anzac nurses this year Laura Z, Bronwyn Z, Molly Q, Eliza P, Olivia H, Abbey C, Tess M, Chantelle G, Emeline L, Eve M, Aimee C, Olivia M and Alessandra R from St Peter’s, were in attendance.

Anzac Memorial

We were treated to lunch in the Parkes Room, a room that Sir Henry Parkes would frequent during his various stints as Premier. Mr Warren also came and spoke to the girls after his statement and presented the College with an oil painting of poppies engraved with a plaque to commemorate the occasion. He was very generous with his time and spoke with the girls about his own inspirations and how important it was for the girls to continue their commemoration of our servicemen and women.

We also had time to visit the Anzac Memorial and visit the new extensions. The students were particularly interested in the authentic World War II nurse outfits on display and examining the soil samples from all the towns where soldiers originated. We were able to  track down ‘Campbelltown’ and ‘Camden’.

To see The Macarthur Advertiser’s article about our visit see https://www.wollondillyadvertiser.com.au/story/6303479/schools-history-club-praised-in-state-parliament-photos/

Fran Musico Rullo  (All photos are courtesy of Jeff McGill)

The full text of Greg Warren’s Statement in Parliament is below from the Hansard

Mr GREG WARREN (Campbelltown) (12:19): When we reflect on World War I and World War II we often cast our minds back to the soldiers, sailors and airmen who bravely sacrificed their lives defending our great nation.

However, there is another aspect of those wars that we do not regularly acknowledge and in June this year an exhibition by the history club of the St Patrick's College for Girls in Campbelltown did just that by paying homage to local nurses who served in the various wars.

I acknowledge the many history club members who hosted the event and who are present in the gallery today.

From the moment that the other guests and I walked through the school's front door, we were greeted by students dressed in historical uniforms as a tribute to the local nurses. It was not the first time they had donned their outfits; they also dressed up during Anzac Day commemorations earlier this year.

Nurses who served in World War I, including Sister Eleanor Dagma Gjedsted, Sister Ida May Graham, Sister Clarice Elizabeth Green, Sister Elizabeth McRae, Sister Dora Ohlfsen-Bagge and Sister Elizabeth Chisholm Thomson, were represented by students Bronwyn Z, Laura Z, Olivia H, Molly Q, Olivia M and Eve M respectively. Nursing Sister Ruth Allardyce Steel was represented by two students-Abbey C and Eliza P. Aimee C and Alessandra R, a Year 3 student from St Peter's Anglican Primary School, also dressed up as Red Cross nurses who served in World War I. World War II nurses Sister Helen Haultain and Sister Nea Hildred were represented by Tess M and Emeline L, and Chantelle G was dressed as a nurse from the Vietnam War era. 

The students' effort and attention to detail was impeccable. It was obvious that a lot of time and thought had gone into the designs. Credit for that must go to all the students, but particularly Lucette Zapirain. I commend Fran Musico-Rullo for her role as organiser.

One of the local nurses represented in the history club's exhibition was Sister Eleanor Dagma Gjedsted, who was born in Campbelltown in 1884 to Edward and Eleanor. Her decision to enlist was particularly timely as it was the day after the Gallipoli landings.

After enlisting in the Australian Army Nursing Service, Sister Eleanor was assigned to the No. 1 Australian General Hospitals in Egypt and London. She then joined the No. 3 Australian Casualty Clearing Station in France.

The horror and devastation of the action on the frontline is often talked about. Undoubtedly, Sister Eleanor was not immune to the carnage that she experienced during the Great War. She would have been completely exposed to the brutality of war including gunshots, shrapnel wounds and missing limbs. Her ability and willingness to nurse, care for and treat the wounded soldiers and service personnel during their time of distress would have had a profound impact on those soldiers and their families. I am sure Sister Eleanor's wartime memories never left her until the day she died in 1955, aged 71.

Sister Elizabeth McRae was one of the more documented nurses from World War I. Her journey, duty and life was captured by Jeff McGill, the former editor of the Campbelltown-Macarthur Advertiser, who led the successful push to have a street in Minto, her former home town, named after her.

It is fitting that Jeff is here today in the gallery. This confronting passage from one of Jeff's yarns in April 2015 sums up the stark reality of Sister Elizabeth's role during the war: "She saw more danger in World War I than some of our male veterans and, as a surgical nurse on the Western Front, was up to her elbows in blood as bombs and gas shells fell around her."

This is why the history club at St Patrick's College for Girls in Campbelltown is so important. The club was formed in 2017. It encourages our youngest generations to not only learn about but also understand the plight of all our veterans and what they went through. Whether they be soldiers or nurses, airmen or sailors, so many Australians played critical roles during the many wars in our history. Their contribution and dedication should never be taken for granted or forgotten.

Well done to the history club for keeping the memory of our veterans alive. Lest we forget.

Fran Musico Rullo - HSIE Teacher

Mock Mediation

On Monday 5 August the Year 10 Mock Mediation team took part in Round 3 of the NSW Law Society's Mock Mediation Competition.

The girls performed very well resolving issues of a scenario that involved stolen plans to a robot they had designed. They faced some ethical dilemmas and were confronted with some challenging decisions after receiving their confidential 'secret' information on the day. Chantelle D and Cordelia P excelled in their roles as mediators, providing guidance to both parties through the mediation process. Jessica N, Caragh P, Marissa K and and Jadyn B showed excellent knowledge of their characters and worked hard to come up with strategies to resolve the issues presented. They received an outstanding result, scoring 92%, leaving them with a good chance of making the Quarter Finals which will be announced next week. Many thanks to Mr East and Miss Iler for their help adjudicating on the day. 

Jason Muller - Mock Mediation Coach

You're Invited....

Receptionist Required for SGS Congregational Centre, Glebe

Important Dates

What's on ... 

Image courtesy of Joshua Combes - CAPA Coordinator

for all events at the College, CLICK HERE